Can you be tried for a crime committed in another country?

No, however you can, and will, be held for extradition to, and for the foreign government/County provided the United States has an extradition agreement/treaty with the same Country.

Can a person be prosecuted for a crime committed in another country?

A: Diplomats are not subject to prosecution for crimes they commit in the country in which they are stationed. This is the general rule followed by most countries in the world, not just the U.S. The country in which the crime is committed is usually limited to ordering the offending diplomat to leave the country.

What happens if you commit a crime in a different country?

If countries have agreement to try their citizens according to their own laws independent of where the crime was committed, then you will be extradited and tried in your country of origin.

What happens if a US citizen commits a crime in another country?

No one leaves any country “via their local embassy,” whether or not they have committed and been tried and jailed for a local crime. When their jail time is completed, they might be expelled from that country, and their embassy will not/not object, but that is as far as embassy “protection” goes.

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What happens if you are wanted in another country?

Yes, the process is usually extradition. The criminal can’t usually be charged in the new country, because they haven’t broken that country’s laws. So the country where the crime was committed (eg India) would apply to the new country (eg Singapore) for extradition.

Can you be charged in the UK for a crime committed in another country?

The courts may also try foreign nationals for offences committed on UK ships in the ‘high seas’. The UK courts have jurisdiction over any offence committed in UK territorial waters regardless of the nationality of the offender or of the flag state that the ship is registered under.

What countries have no extradition laws?

The following countries have been known to refuse U.S. extradition requests, despite having treaties: Bolivia, Ecuador, Iceland, Nicaragua, Switzerland, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

Countries with No U.S. Extradition Treaty.

Afghanistan Ethiopia Nepal
Cameroon the Maldives Syria
Cape Verde Mali Taiwan

Can a US citizen go to jail in another country?

If arrested abroad, a citizen must go through the foreign legal process for being charged or indicted, prosecuted, possibly convicted and sentenced, and for any appeals process. Within this framework, U.S. consular officers provide a wide variety of services to U.S. citizens arrested abroad and their families.

Can a foreign government take your passport?

Passports may be seized by foreign governments if the bearer is suspected of committing a crime while traveling internationally. Passports can also be seized by the issuing government while the bearer is at home, to prevent flight out of the country while the bearer is under investigation for a crime or awaiting trial.

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How long does it take to extradite someone from another country?

Extradition of persons located abroad can take many months or even years to complete. The United States works with foreign authorities to locate wanted persons and then to request the extradition of the person. However, the extradition case is handled by the foreign authorities in the foreign courts.

How do you know if you’re wanted?

If you suspect that you are wanted by the police, and you are ready to turn yourself it, simply ask a police officer. The police can access a warrant database and check if there is an outstanding warrant for your arrest. If there is a warrant out for you, the officer is very likely to take you into custody.

What states are non extradition?

Because federal law regulates extradition between states, there are no states that do not have extradition. As of 2010, Florida, Alaska, and Hawaii do not extradite for misdemeanor convictions committed in another U.S. state.

Legality